AU World Affairs

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          Australia’s World Affairs

 

 

 

July 2016

The Leadership of Australia in the World-1

Counter-ISIL Coalition Conference in Washington DC

1-Australia DFAT-logo Protected by copy right LawMinister of Foreign Affairs Julie Bishop has attended in the Counter-ISIL Coalition Conference in Washington DC on July  21

I will represent Australia at the first joint Counter-ISIL Coalition Foreign and Defence Ministers’ meetings in Washington on 21 July. I will be joined by my colleague, the Minister for Defence Marise Payne.”

“I will also take part in a panel discussion with leaders of the international security community on the importance of intelligence sharing and cooperation in the fight against ISIL.   As part of Australia’s ongoing commitment to Peace and Stability in Iraq and  announce that Australia will provide a further $15 million in Humanitarian and Stabilisation Assistance. This will include $5 million to Clear Landmines from Civilian areas, $5 million for the World Food Programme for urgent food relief, $3 million for UN High Commissioner for Refugees, and $2 million for the UN Iraq Humanitarian Pooled Fund.

This additional assistance brings Australia’s Humanitarian Response to the Iraq crisis to $60 million since 2014.  Since 2011, Australia has also provided $213 million in response to the Syrian crisis, and we have committed a further $220 million for Humanitarian Relief in Syria and neighbouring countries over the next three years.” Stated Minister of Foreign Affairs  Bishop July 20, 2016 © DFAT of Australia

Additional:  Speech by Foreign Affairs Julie Bishop to Counter-ISIL Foreign and Defence Ministers’ Meeting, Joint Plenary Session Intervention. Department of State Washington D.C,  21 July 2016

Defense Secretary Ash Carter met with Minister of Defense of Australia Marise Payne  July 20, 2016

 

 

 

 

May 2016

Australia-European Union an enduring Partnership

2-Australia DFAT-logo Protected by copy right Law  Australia-European Union Free Trade Agreement FTA

As a bloc, the EU is Australia’s largest source of foreign investment and second largest trading partner. In 2014, the EU’s foreign direct investment in Australia was valued at $169.6 billion and Australian foreign direct investment in the EU was valued at $83.5 billion. Total two-way merchandise and services trade between Australia and the EU was worth $83.9 billion. © Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Key interests and benefits

  • A comprehensive, high-quality Australia-EU FTA would help to ensure our trade and investment relationship reaches its full potential
  • An Australia-EU FTA would remove barriers to trade in goods
  • An Australia-EU FTA could expand services linkages and investment ties
  • An Australia-EU FTA could enhance regulatory cooperation in specific sectors of interest to business.  © Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

 

 

 

February 2016

2-Australia DFAT-logo Protected by copy right Law Australian government increased its Humanitarian Aid for Iraq and Syria

$25 million increase in response to Syria and Iraq crises , Feb 2016

The Australian Government response to the crisis in Syria

Follow news from Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

1-Australia DFAT-logo Protected by copy right Law Learn about Australia

Australia’s Aboriginal people, the original inhabitants of the Australian continent, arrived at least 60,000 years ago.

Parts of the continent were mapped by Dutch navigators in the 17th century and by French and British navigators the following century, but it was not until 1770 that Captain James Cook charted the east coast and claimed it for Great Britain.

From 1788Britain established penal colonies in New South Wales, Tasmania and Western Australia. Free settlers followed in increasing numbers, gradually outnumbering convicts. A colony made up entirely of free settlers was established in South Australia in the 1830s.

Queensland and Victoria separated from New South Wales in the 1850s, by which time gold had been discovered in New South Wales and Victoria. The gold rush brought immigrants to Australia from all over the world. In 1901, the six colonies united to form the federal Commonwealth of Australia. © Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade     Continue to Read

Australia’s National Symbols

The Australian Flag: The stars of the Southern Cross represent Australia’s geographic position in the Southern Hemisphere. The large Commonwealth star symbolises the federation of the states and territories, and the Union Jack reflects Australia’s early ties to Great Britain.  © Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade     Continue to Read

Government System

From the 1850s to the 1890s, when few other countries in the world were democratic, the Australian colonies progressively established universal male suffrage, and were also among the first to give women the vote.

Australian democracy has at its heart the following core defining values:

  • Freedom of election and being elected
  • Freedom of assembly and political participation
  • Freedom of speech, expression and religious belief
  • Rule of law other basic human rights.  © Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade    Continue to Read 

Economy

Australia is a Global Leader in five significant and diverse sectors:  Agribusiness,  Education,  Tourism, Mining and  Wealth Management. © Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade       Continue to Read

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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